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Woopig Assistance => Woopig News and Help => Topic started by: pigtacular on April 08, 2020, 08:30:42 PM

Title: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 08, 2020, 08:30:42 PM
I'm wanting to pour a 30x30 concrete slab in by backyard.

The issue is I live on 3 acres and my house is at the back of the property on a hill(slopes from the road up to the house).  I have a 500 ft asphalt driveway the cement truck would use to get back there.

I'm concerned about the damage the truck might do to the driveway I had resurfaced 1 year ago.

Does anyone have any experience with a similar scenario or recommendations?
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Swahili Steve on April 08, 2020, 10:36:53 PM
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Quikrete-80-lb-High-Early-Strength-Concrete-Mix-100700/100318486

Your welcome. I used to sell this shit.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 08, 2020, 10:54:35 PM
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Quikrete-80-lb-High-Early-Strength-Concrete-Mix-100700/100318486

Your welcome. I used to sell this shit.

Nice!  :maundoed:
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: ArkGuy on April 09, 2020, 01:31:49 AM
30x30’=900 sq ft surface area
4” slab means 300 cu ft
The 80# bag has 0.6 cu ft of coverage
500 bags x 0.6 = 300 cu ft

500 bags will cost $3,000 plus tax minus any discount.
500 bags will weigh 40,000 pounds. 20 tons. Shuttling 500 bags up and down that driveway will be ... interesting.

300 cu ft = 11.111 yards.

It might be cheaper to truck it in and build a new driveway. ;D
Or precast it in 3 or 4 sections and have it dropped in place by helicopter.

Maybe my math is way off.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 09, 2020, 04:26:28 AM
Is using power buggies a legitimate option?  They could then go through the yard in a straighter line, or even up the driveway I suppose. I read they can handle up to 19 cubic feet/load.  Would they be able to get the mix from the truck to the site fast enough? 

Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Animal on April 09, 2020, 08:23:33 AM
Aren't they called Georgia Buckets?
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 09, 2020, 08:28:03 AM
Aren't they called Georgia Buckets?

I've seen them referred to by both names.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Swahili Steve on April 09, 2020, 08:39:03 AM
30x30’=900 sq ft surface area
4” slab means 300 cu ft
The 80# bag has 0.6 cu ft of coverage
500 bags x 0.6 = 300 cu ft

500 bags will cost $3,000 plus tax minus any discount.
500 bags will weigh 40,000 pounds. 20 tons. Shuttling 500 bags up and down that driveway will be ... interesting.

300 cu ft = 11.111 yards.

It might be cheaper to truck it in and build a new driveway. ;D
Or precast it in 3 or 4 sections and have it dropped in place by helicopter.

Maybe my math is way off.
yeah I didn’t bother with the math this is just what most people do for patios, small foundations ect on their own.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 09, 2020, 08:53:31 AM
yeah I didn’t bother with the math this is just what most people do for patios, small foundations ect on their own.

I don't think most people do that big of a job by themselves.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: razorwire on April 09, 2020, 11:09:47 AM
Is using power buggies a legitimate option?  They could then go through the yard in a straighter line, or even up the driveway I suppose. I read they can handle up to 19 cubic feet/load.  Would they be able to get the mix from the truck to the site fast enough?
Using bags or the Georgia Buckets, the project could be poured in sections (use extra expansion joints) so you could periodically stop.  You would not  need to use  concrete that dries fast.  Use regular concrete.

What is the rush?  Yes, this would take a while to complete.  However, you could use a pick-up truck to deliver the bags or keep the big truck on the main road and use the buckets.  You could use a pick-up truck or two with mason's pans in them and fill the pans from the truck and carefully drive to your pour site.  Cover pickup truck beds with blue tarps and hire large men or women to help shovel the concrete into your form.

As for damage to your driveway, I just had two large trees removed from my backyard and the tree removal company equipment trucks destroyed my old concrete driveway.  You do not want that large concrete truck on your driveway, especially if it is asphalt and you are working on a hot day. 
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 09, 2020, 07:29:56 PM

As for damage to your driveway, I just had two large trees removed from my backyard and the tree removal company equipment trucks destroyed my old concrete driveway.  You do not want that large concrete truck on your driveway, especially if it is asphalt and you are working on a hot day.

That's the conclusion I've come to after researching and hearing from people with experience like yourself.

I've talked with 2 contractors, one stated his solution to my predicament was to use the Georgia Buggies.   The other stated my driveway would probably be fine.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: The Reverend Snoophogg on April 09, 2020, 09:28:12 PM
900sf =just under 11 yards.  Have the truck bring it in two or three loads, pour one side30x10, pour the opposite side the same, then Pour your center section.  Hire a crew of guys to do it, they would appreciate the slower pace, and you can take the inside forms down and not have an expansion joint, unless you just want one.  Concrete trucks have enormous tires on them and they spread the footprint out pretty well.  Ten yards Is a max load, so you’d have to get two anyway...

I’ve had ten yard trucks on my asphalt driveway in the deathoven heat of August and never left a mark, but I also has a hell of a gravel bed under it.  I poured 120 yards in two days, never had an issue.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Hogwildpigcrazy on April 20, 2020, 02:06:01 PM
Let me state that I am a complete dumbass and have no experience pouring slabs. But couldn’t the trucks just drive through the grass? It could easily be restored.

Screen door is handy if needed.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Son_of_Spam on April 20, 2020, 04:18:28 PM
We had a 20x29 pad poured last year. Our driveway was cracked and we knew it would be destroyed, but we were going to replace it anyway. Also had 32 loads of dirt brought in to level the ground. After a few loads, they had to put some gravel down on top,of the driveway to get in and out. Over a year now and it still hasn’t dried up enough to get the driveway replaced because of all the fucking rain. However, we have a guy lined up if it ever quits raining. Good luck.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Tanny Bogus on April 20, 2020, 04:50:45 PM
They can reach part of the way with a boom but that distance would vary based on the equipment the company has available obviously.  Not sure if it would even help much in your case.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 20, 2020, 07:09:24 PM
Let me state that I am a complete dumbass and have no experience pouring slabs. But couldn’t the trucks just drive through the grass? It could easily be restored.

Screen door is handy if needed.

If it was just grass, I wouldn't be concerned.  My house is at the back of the property.  It's either up the driveway on one side or up a hill over my septic tank and field lines on the other.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: The Reverend Snoophogg on April 20, 2020, 09:00:27 PM
Let me state that I am a complete dumbass and have no experience pouring slabs. But couldn’t the trucks just drive through the grass? It could easily be restored.

Screen door is handy if needed.

That’s the best way to get a $2-3k towing bill to have the 40 ton concrete truck removed from your yard.

Concrete trucks sink.  A lot.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: HOGGLY WOGGLY on April 23, 2020, 07:47:58 AM
You need something like this.

https://www.prestogeo.com/products/construction-mats/georunner-turf-protection-mats/
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: razorwire on April 23, 2020, 11:30:29 AM
Let me state that I am a complete dumbass and have no experience pouring slabs. But couldn’t the trucks just drive through the grass? It could easily be restored.

Screen door is handy if needed.
It would probably sink like a stone.  Oh,  hire a couple of Mexicans or FBIs to move that wet concrete around.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: The Reverend Snoophogg on April 23, 2020, 12:33:27 PM
How far off the road/hard surface is it?  A pumper truck might reach....don’t know what your budget is, but may be worth looking into.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 23, 2020, 05:12:55 PM
How far off the road/hard surface is it?  A pumper truck might reach....don’t know what your budget is, but may be worth looking into.

It's probably 400+ ft with most of that traveling uphill.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Too Big Pig on April 23, 2020, 08:01:25 PM
Those of you who have had this done recently or priced it, what price range am I looking at to add some extra parking area to my existing driveway. 

I'm thinking about 525 square feet.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: The Reverend Snoophogg on April 23, 2020, 08:52:13 PM
The price of concrete on a 4” slab will run you about $1.20 a sf, usually you can get a couple Mexicans (not being racist, they are just good at it and good workers, and usually cheaper) to finish it for about $1 a sf.  If you form it up for them and have it ready, you should be able to get it done for about $1200~?

If you are going to park and or drive on it, I’d throw in some rebar.  You can buy it in 20’ sticks at Lowe’s or depot, pretty cheap, lay it out in a one 12” or 16” grid, depending on the size of the rod(heh heh, that’s what she said) and that will add another $100-$150, maybe.  Be sure to block it up off the ground a couple inches at the intersections.  I just use pieces of concrete block or rocks or whatever.  They make little plastic chairs for it, but the are $$$ and you can buy a concrete block for $2, smash it with a hammer, and get 30 pieces out of it for what one of the chairs will cost.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: The Reverend Snoophogg on April 23, 2020, 09:02:20 PM
It's probably 400+ ft with most of that traveling uphill.

Pumper truck isn’t going to help you much then.  Range is about 75 yards on the biggest ones, most are around 100-150 feet.  Rental will run you about $800-$1000.

You will prolly be better off renting a Georgia buggy or two.

If you have some softish areas you are worried about, buy a few sheets of 3/4 cd plywood.  It’s about $25 a sheet, but will save your yard some serious ruts.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Buffinator on April 27, 2020, 03:45:05 PM
Power buggies - You'll need at least 2 to maintain a continuous placement and avoid potential cold joints.

Pump truck - Depending where you are, there may not be one within 100 miles that has the kind of reach you need, assuming you can even reach the area without booming over the house.

Sack mix on site - Would make a mess and possibly give you an inferior product.

Without knowing where you live or what the area looks like it's hard to make a best-case guess for the approach.  If you hire Mexicans to place and finish the concrete, make sure you know what finish you want and learn the words "no agua".
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 27, 2020, 08:07:12 PM
Speaking of finish, the initial intent is for this to be a basketball court, but I am planning on having footers installed so I can transition it into a shop in the future.

What kind of finish should I be asking for?
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Buffinator on April 27, 2020, 08:55:16 PM
If it's going to be a shop in the future I would have said smooth trowel finish.  But here's the chemistry problem....

For an exterior basketball court, you'd want air-entrained concrete for durability, especially in freeze-thaw cycles.  If you smooth trowel air-entrained concrete you eventually wind up with delamination and scaling at the surface.

Either skip the entrained air and smooth trowel it, or order the concrete with air-entrainment and apply a light broomed finish (that you have the option of coating over or sanding smooth later on for the shop floor.

Personally I'd have a lightly-textured broom finish and worry about whether to sand or coat later when it's turned into a shop.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: pigtacular on April 27, 2020, 10:56:36 PM
If it's going to be a shop in the future I would have said smooth trowel finish.  But here's the chemistry problem....

For an exterior basketball court, you'd want air-entrained concrete for durability, especially in freeze-thaw cycles.  If you smooth trowel air-entrained concrete you eventually wind up with delamination and scaling at the surface.

Either skip the entrained air and smooth trowel it, or order the concrete with air-entrainment and apply a light broomed finish (that you have the option of coating over or sanding smooth later on for the shop floor.

Personally I'd have a lightly-textured broom finish and worry about whether to sand or coat later when it's turned into a shop.


Thanks, your recommendation is what I was leaning towards just because it made the most sense to me given what I am attempting to do with this project.

Thanks for your input and expertise.   I had done a search and saw you were very knowledgeable on the subject.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Buffinator on April 28, 2020, 08:38:40 AM
Of the few things I'm good at, concrete is where I'm the goodest  :thumbup:  American Concrete Institute has two different special inspector certifications for concrete.  Last I checked I'm the only one in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Arkansas that passed the exams for both - comes in handy on Corps of Engineers projects.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: razorwire on April 28, 2020, 09:25:33 AM
Of the few things I'm good at, concrete is where I'm the goodest  :thumbup:  American Concrete Institute has two different special inspector certifications for concrete.  Last I checked I'm the only one in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Arkansas that passed the exams for both - comes in handy on Corps of Engineers projects.
You are a hard act to follow.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Buffinator on April 28, 2020, 09:33:59 AM
You are a hard act to follow.

But like most concrete, I'm full of cracks and artificial substances.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: razorwire on April 28, 2020, 09:42:36 AM
But like most concrete, I'm full of cracks and artificial substances.
As long  as your cracks don''t expose your aggregates.
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Buffinator on April 28, 2020, 10:10:01 AM
As long  as your cracks don''t expose your aggregates.

 :dude1: My stones are still covered
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: HRC on April 28, 2020, 03:09:27 PM
Of the few things I'm good at, concrete is where I'm the goodest  :thumbup:  American Concrete Institute has two different special inspector certifications for concrete.  Last I checked I'm the only one in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Arkansas that passed the exams for both - comes in handy on Corps of Engineers projects.

Great stuff!
Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: TexZilla on April 29, 2020, 10:45:51 AM
Asking for a friend.  He needs a large patio poured in his backyard, prefrrably late at night.  Will pay cash. 

Title: Re: Concrete slab
Post by: Buffinator on April 29, 2020, 11:14:31 AM
Thanks, your recommendation is what I was leaning towards just because it made the most sense to me given what I am attempting to do with this project.


By the way, make sure whoever you hire can cut and cure the concrete too.  The smarter you sound hiring a contractor or ordering the concrete, the less likely they are to try to screw you over.  Pour it at less than 6" slump, W/C ratio of no more than 0.45, air content in the 4-7% range. 

If you leave the placement up to the contractor, they'll try to pour it soupy wet and not use any mechanical consolidation (vibrating), because they allegedly ordered the concrete with super-plasticizer in it - more cost on the concrete gets offset by the reduced labor cost for them.  Some of the things I've seen contractors do to cut corners have made me want to leave the construction industry altogether.  Or go into politics and legalize murder, for my own selfish desires.

Here's the base spec for what most Federal agencies would require:
https://www.wbdg.org/ffc/dod/unified-facilities-guide-specifications-ufgs/ufgs-03-30-00